What percentage of Belfast is Catholic?

What is the percentage of Catholic and Protestant in Northern Ireland?

Christianity is the main religion in Northern Ireland. The 2011 UK census showed 40.8% Catholic, 19.1% Presbyterian Church, with the Church of Ireland having 13.7% and the Methodist Church 5.0%.

Is Northern Ireland mostly Catholic?

Most of the population of Northern Ireland are at least nominally Christian, mostly Roman Catholic and Protestant denominations. … Protestants have a slight majority in Northern Ireland, according to the latest Northern Ireland Census.

Is Belfast Protestant or Catholic?

In the Belfast City Council and Derry and Strabane District Council areas, the figures at ward level vary from 95% Protestant to 99% Catholic.

List of districts in Northern Ireland by religion or religion brought up in.

District Belfast
Catholic 40%
Protestant and other Christian 49.5%
Other 8.7%

Is Ballymena Catholic or Protestant?

Ballymena is the buckle in Northern Ireland’s Bible belt, the seat of the Paisley family and a place that has been likened to 1960s Mississippi. It is rural, conservative, mainly born-again Christian and predominantly Protestant. Catholics make up about 25% of the borough.

Are there no go areas in Belfast?

The main areas to avoid in Belfast are the areas around the Shankill and Falls roads at night (West Belfast), areas in North Belfast like Tiger’s Bay, New Lodge and Ardoyne (at night) and the likes of Short Strand in East Belfast (again, at night).

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Which areas of Northern Ireland are Catholic?

Looking at the percentage of the population with a Catholic community background, it’s clear that some districts, such as Newry and Mourne (79.4 per cent), Derry (74.8 per cent) and Omagh (70.3 per cent), are predominantly Catholic, whereas districts such as Carrickfergus (9.6 per cent), Ards (12.7 per cent) and North …

Where do most Protestants live in Northern Ireland?

About 30% of Ulster Protestants live in the three counties of Ulster now in the Republic of Ireland, Cavan, Monaghan, and Donegal, where they make up around a fifth of the Republic’s Protestant population.